Neuter and spay clinic/ Ek Balam, Mexico

Anyone who is familiar with rural Mexico knows what a problem stray and feral dogs are. They lead short miserable lives and are often killed or crippled by automobile traffic. In addition to the inhumane circumstances of the dogs, there are community health hazards as well. Roving packs of aggressive feral dogs are dangerous. So is the strewn garbage from their rummaging, and the fouled streets where children run barefoot. This past weekend I shot a short documentary to promote the efforts of a group of volunteers who conducted a free neuter and spay clinic for the town of Ek Balam…a small, remote village in the state of Yucatán, Mexico. The clinic was held at the town’s municipal building. In addition to catching some strays, the clinic provided services to family dogs who might sire litters of feral dogs.

I’ll be working on editing the documentary for a while yet, so, this morning I cut this piece to provide a more timely look at the program. This video follows one particular dog, Drego, as he goes through the entire process: arrival, anesthesia, surgery, ear tattoo, recovery, and a tail-wagging return home. Drego is a very big and very sweet family dog. Someone said that he is part mastiff and part pit bull. The father sports a Maya warrior haircut from his role as a re-enactor at the nearby Ek Balam ruins.

Kudos to the many volunteers who spent the day working hard, pro bono, in the heat of the Yucatán interior, and thanks to Lee Christie whose Genesis Eco-Oasis was a beautiful and hospitable place from which the event was staged.

I hope you will watch the video and share to help promote this and other neuter and spay programs.

Note: there are a few scenes of canine surgery that some people might find disturbing.