Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, New Mexico

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Digital media production

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Posting an ad for my services. I have extensive experience in creating messages for international organizations; education, NGOs, and non-profits.


Hummingbird/ This morning in Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

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The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array/ Central New Mexico

The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array is a radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, and was a location in the movie “Contact.” It is on a fairly isolated high desert plateau (about 7,000 ft.) and surrounded by mountains, making it an ideal spot to avoid the normal wireless interference in cities. The lack of humidity in the air also makes for a clearer radio signal. There is no cell service there and visitors are asked to put their phones in airplane mode.

The array is routinely re-configured to cover different parts of the sky by moving the dishes on a network of railroad tracks.

This is part of a photo series featuring the American southwest.

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Desert Rose in bloom/ Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Gathering of Nations/ Albuquerque, New Mexico

Billed as the “The Biggest Pow Wow in North America,” the Gathering of Nations brings together participants from Indigenous Nations all over Canada, the US, and Mexico.

This is part of a photo series featuring the American southwest.

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The Turquoise Trail/ Madrid, New Mexico

This is a photo series of the deserts of the American southwest. Subscribe to the blog for updates.

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Cattle crossing sign on The Turquoise Trail

 

The Turquoise Trail (named for its rich deposits of turquoise) connects Albuquerque to Santa Fe. There are several small towns along the route, including Madrid (pronounced MAD-rid…NOT like the Spanish city), which was a coal mining town, supplying coal to the railroads. When the mine closed in the 1950’s, it became a derelict ghost town…until the 60’s when hippies, artists, and free-thinkers moved into the small wood frame houses and created an eclectic community. Today, it is known for its colorful shops in the old mining buildings.

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The Mine Shaft Tavern was built in 1947 and attracts a diverse crowd …artists, tourists, and bikers. It has a reputation for hauntings.

 

 

Here’s a segment on Madrid’s Christmas parade from CBS Sunday Morning…worth watching:    https://www.cbs.com/shows/cbs-sunday-morning/video/cMqkwvamLSlR5BuSLSTV0RgabDBxUb0F/a-shining-christmas-in-a-once-dead-mining-town/ 

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